On 14th September 2017 SEA launched the first of 2 workshops introducing mentors to mentees and setting the scene for our first SEA/WISE mentorship program.

Now we have led the horses to water, so to speak, how can we assist in getting them to drink. This was the main goal of the workshop. Both Frances Eaton and Arvind Chetty introduced some key principles on how to make the relationship work.

It is all about engagement. Mentoring relationships, just like any other relationship, need commitment, communication and preparation.

Start with the basics

Frances explained that the first step to engagement between mentor and mentee is to have both parties on the same page and believing in the viable success of the partnership. Using their detailed workbook, the mentors and mentees paired off to discuss the following:

Objectives must be defined.

The attendees were asked to discuss the who and the why. Who are you, what brought you to seek a mentor/mentee, what drives you and what are your goals as well as why ….why are we meeting and what do we want to accomplish? If both mentor and mentee understand their roles and duties, they will understand that this mentorship has a purpose to achieve.

Timing is everything.

As both participants are busy people, there need to be clearly defined times to meet and those times need to be adhered to. We asked the attendees to be realistic with the time frame they set and for the mentee to develop leadership in following up and driving the engagement dates and times.

Keep up with progress.

Mentees and mentors should track the progress made in the relationship, not only for the ROI for the program, but to insure the partnership is productive. Frances explained that like any partnership, if there is no ‘chemistry’ and the relationship isn’t working out there is always a “no fault reassignment policy” to ensure both parties can continue mentoring.

Feedback should be encouraged and expected.

This relationship is about achieving progress. Feedback and guidance should factor into that regularly.

A mentoring relationship is a highly functioning relationship that can achieve results if flowing smoothly. Arvind indicated that he has been a mentor for many years and feels he has learned as much from his mentees as he hoped they learned from him. It is important to understand that as long as both parties are clear on what they need to achieve, when they are going to achieve it, and how they will go about doing so, the mentorship will perform well.

For more information about our program and the next intake, please contact Frances at SEA

(frances@subseaenergy.org.au) or check out our website: (www.subseaenergy.org.au)